Goal Setting

In our official evaluation calendar, this is the time of year when faculty set goals for next year.  Often these goals get tweaked in the fall, but basically, by now, we start reflecting on how the year went, and how we could improve things for next year.  We’ve received feedback from department chairs and divisions directors, and even students.  Armed with that feedback, we will decide what to prioritize.

Next year, I will have some lofty, school-wide goals.  I am still working on that, but I have some ideas.  I will still be teaching two classes (3 really, 1 year-long, 2 semester classes), so I have been thinking about how to approach them.

Introduction to Computer Science went well this year.   I had 28 students split into 2 sections.  We went a little slower as I spent a lot of time helping people in class.  I really want to find a way to further encourage self-dependence rather than everyone waiting for me.  Honestly, the projects where folks did not get a lot of help turned out better than the ones where I had to hand-hold a lot.   The feedback from the students was that they wanted a few more structured lessons on the concepts.  I agree, but I also think partly they don’t really grasp the concepts when I teach them and then when they’re trying to use them in a project, they realize they didn’t grasp them.  They liked the videos I created, so I think I will do more of those.  I’m not satisfied with any of the textbooks I’ve tried, so it’s all on me, I guess.  I’m thinking about moving the robot stuff to the end of the year and opening up the possibility of building robots instead of or in addition to working with pre-built ones.

CSII kind of worked, but we lost a lot of time to snow.  I also struggled more than usual keeping them on task.  Last year, I had 3 students compared to 10 this year, so that was a very different experience.  I’m considering starting in Python and shifting to Processing for CSII.

Mobile Computing was new.  We used Stencyl, and it worked fairly well.  But I think I’m going to look for something that’s a little less buggy and a little more CS-y.  I’m thinking about TouchDevelop, but I know very little about it, so we’ll see.  The structure of the course worked fairly well, so I will keep that and just change up the language/tool.

Creative Computing was an experiment in the Middle School.  I’ve enjoyed it, and I think the students got a fair amount out of it.  Frankly, I didn’t put enough time into developing this.  It won’t be offered next year as we changed our schedule, but I got to try some new things and got some ideas for other classes.  I learned how to laser cut so that was good.

So there’s work to do over the summer!

Have you thought about goals for next year yet? Reflecting on this year? I think I’ve reached the point where I’m ready to wrap this year up. It’s so close!

2 Replies to “Goal Setting”

  1. “I’m not satisfied with any of the textbooks I’ve tried”. Hear, hear! In all my years of looking (20?) I have only found two halfway decent textbooks for programming. “Learning Mobile App & Game Dev w Corona” by Brian Burton and even that spends very little time on programming concepts like problem solving. Consider it for your Mobile Computing course. For Python take a look at “Think Python: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist” by Allen Downey. It is free and does a good job for an intro course. I am still trying to find a high school level text for Java. I used “Java” by Lewis and Loftus this year. “And at this point magic occurs!” They cannot explain a lot of stuff.

  2. Yes, and I also find most programming texts are aimed at college level students. There are things I just cannot expect of a 9th grader that are expected of a first-year college student. I have my own materials for Python that work pretty well, but I might look at the Think Python book. I probably have it somewhere. I have a ton. I looked at Corona last year. I might consider it again.

Comments are closed.